Laura Erickson's For the Birds

Tuesday, October 9, 2007

Disney Wild!

I spent Sunday at Disney World. Joe was working and I got to see his performance (he dances on stilts) at the Lion King Festival. Then I spent the rest of the day trying to amass photographs of at least 20 wild birds at the theme park. I haven't had time to go over all of them yet, and with my poor mother-in-law in the hospital and me going to Stevens Point tomorrow (I even made the Stevens Point Journal!), I can't finish it up. But I did make my Disney goal--here are a few of the photos I took:
Would this be the last thing a fish ever sees?
Great Egrets are all over the place.
House Sparrow
Not a bird--but dragonflies were everywhere.Garden spiders are gorgeous.White Ibises are abundant.
First time I ever saw a Limpkin right in Disney World!
I don't know which lizard this is.
Black Vulture.
Great Blue Heron
Let sleeping ducks lie.
My Joey in front of the Animal Kingdom's joeys.
Wood Stork flying overhead.
Lousy picture of a gorgeous bird.
Mourning Dove
Is this a frittilary? (See comments for answer)
Anhinga
Another Mallard

4 comments :

  1. Yes, Laura it is a fritillary.
    It is the Gulf Fritillary---
    Agraulis vanillae. Nice photos.

    Hap in New Hope, MN

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  2. I got my life Anhinga, White Ibis, and Common Moorhen (with chicks) at Disney World. I wish I saw a Limpkin!

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  3. When we're in Florida, I consider it a good day any day that I see a wood stork - love them! Never saw one at Disney, though.

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  4. I had a really nice checklist of birds I've seen at Disney on birderblog back when it was my web site. I'll try to find it and get it up again. I see more Wood Storks at Sea World, but find it disturbing whenever I see them at any theme park. Those noble birds reduced to begging! And the saddest thing is that these adults probably just don't breed.

    This time at Merritt Island I saw only one Wood Stork--flying overhead. I was sad not to see them there, where it's actually wild and natural habitat.

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